Human Resource Management Executive Development Program 2

Enrollment Open now!

About this Program

Let’s take it a little higher. In the HRM Executive Development Program I, we strategically positioned learners for the expected role-plays in the human resource development. Now, the part 2, which are not mutually exclusive, learners are engaged to take their role in HRM more strategically developing self, others and organization through a progressive learning experience and action oriented approach.

Recruiting quality personnel, engaging and retaining the best brains are essential take away from this program. Management team should take a critical study of this program from organizational stability.

What will you Learn

  • Develop strong skills for managing people

  • Attract the best talent and retain them

  • Lead strategic decision-making about talent management and organizational development

  • Learn how to design and lead a team, project, and organization

AT A GLANCE

100% online

Start instantly and learn at your pace.

Flexible deadlines

Study on demand at your schedule.

Approx. 14 hours to complete

Suggested: 7 weeks of study, 75 minutes/week

Language

All courses are in English language.

Program Syllabus

Course 1

Strategic Human Resource Management

4.7

When managing people it is essential that we treat them well and treat them fairly. As we study different aspects of management it becomes clear that it is important to motivate people, to invest in their development and learning, and to support them as they develop in their careers. These are all important matters that should take up a considerable amount of management time.

However, there is also the need to operate within the law. Doing something that breaches the law is likely to de-motivate employees because they will perceive that they are not been treated correctly. It is also likely to take up a lot of management time whilst related grievances are addressed and even, perhaps, attending court to respond to a claim.

In the UK the law relating to employment has been one of the fastest growing areas of law. This has led to the current coalition government becoming concerned that employment law is too onerous for employers and so there are certain changes being made that will reduce some of the burdens on employers.

Despite the changes that are planned (which we will address as we work through this module) there are still a lot of legal issues relating to the employment of people. Managers need to know about this law. Even if an organization has a company solicitor, managers still need to be aware of the parameters within which they can operate.

As employment law is such a vast topic it is not possible to cover every aspect in one module. In this module we are going to focus on the issues that managers need to consider most often. We are going to start by thinking about employment status. We are going to consider the different types of status and what managers might want to recruit into an organization. We will then think about the specific issue of working time.

We are then going to look at the process followed in the Employment Tribunal. This is the place that legal claims relating to employment are heard, and hence it is very important that managers understand how the process works.

After that we will look in depth at the two areas which result in the most claims being brought before the Employment Tribunal, and hence the areas that managers really do need to understand – dismissal and discrimination.

Finally, we will take a brief overview of other areas covered by employment law.

Course 2

Measuring and Rewarding Performance

4.7

If you study the business pages of any newspaper, you will read about the ‘performance of an organization’. You might read about an organization that has performed better than expected, or an organization that has experienced a downturn in performance. This is likely to refer to the profits that an organization has achieved, or the sales that have been made.

There will be a number of reasons for the perceived success or failure in performance. For example, an organization might be operating in a market that has been contracting or where external factors such as the global financial crisis might have affected the performance. However, there is one factor that will definitely have had an impact on the performance of the organization – its people.

If the people in the organization are not motivated, and have not been working as hard as they can, then it is almost inevitable that the performance of the overall organization will have suffered. It is certainly true that an organization can do little about a global financial crisis, such as the one which started in 2008, but it is also true that the organization can take steps to ensure that the employees are performing effectively.

In this module, we are focusing on performance. We are going to start by understanding performance management, and the ‘performance management cycle’. We are going to look at the process that we follow to measure employee performance, focusing specifically on the appraisal process. We will then look at objective setting, and how it can be successfully achieved.

Moving on from this, we will take some time to think about how under-performing employees should be managed. We will consider the process of managing capability, and also consider the role of disciplinary warnings.

We will then think about rewarding performance, looking at a number of different approaches to reward strengths and consider weaknesses. We will also ponder on the issue of motivation, and discuss whether the different approaches to reward really lead to higher performance.

Finally, we will return to the idea of performance management as a cycle, with the belief that it is a never-ending process. Hence, we will think about the importance of personal development plans.

Course 3

Recruitment and CPD

4.8

An organization consists of people. If you think of any organization, whether it is in retail, service, manufacturing or any other sector, there are people involved. It is certainly true that there may be fewer people in some organizations than there were some years ago, due to technology replacing jobs, but I cannot think of any organization that has no people.

People are key to the success of the organization. Have you ever been to a shop, a restaurant or a hotel and been frustrated by the poor level of customer service? Maybe you have even decided that you will not return due to the poor level of customer service received. By making such a decision you are actually deciding that you are not going to give your business to that organization because of the people that you have dealt with. One poor performing employee could impact on the decision about your future custom with that organization. People, therefore, are very important to an organization and we need to be certain that we recruit the very best people to work in it. We could decide that the organization cannot be blamed for the one poor employee who has made us decide that we never want to go to a particular hotel, restaurant or shop ever again. However, someone decided to recruit that individual.

The organization is responsible for the people working in it and for ensuring that only the very best people are there. In this module we are going to look at the process of identifying the very best people to work in an organization. We are going to start by thinking about how we decide which jobs need to be recruited.

We are then going to move on to think about the external and internal factors that can impact on our recruitment decisions and how we might be able to address them. We will then think about how we specify the jobs that we want, and in doing this we will consider the processes of writing job descriptions and person specifications. We will then look at selection techniques and what should be included in a contract that we eventually offer to a successful applicant.

Finally, we will look briefly at the process of continuing professional development.

Course 4

Strategic Human Resource Management

4.8

When managing people it is essential that we treat them well and treat them fairly. As we study different aspects of management it becomes clear that it is important to motivate people, to invest in their development and learning, and to support them as they develop in their careers. These are all important matters that should take up a considerable amount of management time.

However, there is also the need to operate within the law. Doing something that breaches the law is likely to de-motivate employees because they will perceive that they are not been treated correctly. It is also likely to take up a lot of management time whilst related grievances are addressed and even, perhaps, attending court to respond to a claim.

In the UK the law relating to employment has been one of the fastest growing areas of law. This has led to the current coalition government becoming concerned that employment law is too onerous for employers and so there are certain changes being made that will reduce some of the burdens on employers.

Despite the changes that are planned (which we will address as we work through this module) there are still a lot of legal issues relating to the employment of people. Managers need to know about this law. Even if an organization has a company solicitor, managers still need to be aware of the parameters within which they can operate.

As employment law is such a vast topic it is not possible to cover every aspect in one module. In this module we are going to focus on the issues that managers need to consider most often. We are going to start by thinking about employment status. We are going to consider the different types of status and what managers might want to recruit into an organization. We will then think about the specific issue of working time.

We are then going to look at the process followed in the Employment Tribunal. This is the place that legal claims relating to employment are heard, and hence it is very important that managers understand how the process works.

After that we will look in depth at the two areas which result in the most claims being brought before the Employment Tribunal, and hence the areas that managers really do need to understand – dismissal and discrimination.

Finally, we will take a brief overview of other areas covered by employment law.

Instructor

Farah Akbar

Associate Professor
Marketing, communication & research

Farah Akbar brings more than 15 years of marketing & communication, research and experiential marketing, management & leadership, product management, human resource management, and professional development experience spanning both the public and private sectors and including time spent at leading multinational organizations. Her diverse career has led to her recognition as a multi-disciplinary L&D professional and instructor/trainer with extensive work experience in Management & Marketing, Communication, Leadership, Business Research, Human Resources Development, and Career Development...read more

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Course Videos & Readings

Practice Quizzes

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Graded Capstone Assignments

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Frequently Asked Questions

This is an executive program, a certificate of completion will be issued by Tufts Management School.


Yes. We can make available an endorsed certificate by mail. This will cost a token, kindly contact the faculty team before the completion of the program.


Yes. You can reply the online classes if you missed any detail in the session.


Yes. We encourage team learning and participation. You will be required to enroll on a SPARE45 Team or SPARE45 Business account to benefit discounted offer for the team or organization.